Student Reflects on Dropping Enrollment Rates

By Anna Kleinschnitz, Contributing Writer

Walking around the halls of La Roche, one may have noticed a significant lack in attendance. There are little to none incoming freshman, and certain programs are feeling the cold hands of death encroach on their curriculum.

Despite the fact that La Roche University has an acceptance rate of 99 percent, the admission rate has gone down over 67 percent within the last two years. Where are all the people?

According to NPR, the number of students applying to and going to college has been in a steady downward trend since 2012.

The pandemic has seemingly only exacerbated this problem, with a national decrease of 6.6 percent in the last two years. This has totaled to over one million less students than there were before the pandemic began.

So, what is keeping college applicants away?

It could be the fact that many people are still suffering the financial problems that arose during the pandemic; even after two years, people still struggle to find and keep jobs.

It could also be the fact that housing costs rise every single year; according to the Freddie Mac House Price Index, a significant spike in value happened in 2020.

But it might also be the rising feelings of discontentment among the college goers in America. The prices of tuition keep climbing, while wages have been at a stand-still since 2008.

Many college-grads have accepted their fate as permanent renters and struggle to live, just making enough to reach to the next paycheck.

More people are realizing that college has just as many, if not more, disadvantages rather that advantages; especially since college debt is ever increasing and no changes are planned to fix this problem in the future.

La Roche University may be dying, but we all should be glad to realize that the whole Earth is dying anyways, so college is useless ultimately.

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